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Knowledge Management

When employees retire or leave your firm, do they take all their knowledge with them? This is a huge risk and expense to your organization. While you can’t force people to stay with your company, you can retain their expertise. Record their wisdom, store it and use it.

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Data Crush
Book
 

Christopher Surdak

AMACOM, 2014

(9)

Judgment Calls
Book
 

Thomas H. Davenport and Brook Manville

Harvard Business Review Press, 2012

(9)

HR Transformation
Book
 

Dave Ulrich et al.

McGraw-Hill, 2009

(7)

Oracles
Book
 

Donald N. Thompson

Harvard Business Review Press, 2012

(9)

Squirrel Inc.
Book
 

Stephen Denning

Jossey-Bass, 2004

(8)

Thinking For a Living
Book
 

Thomas H. Davenport

Harvard Business Review Press, 2005

(9)

Intellectual Property Strategy
Book
 

John Palfrey

MIT Press, 2012

(8)

HR from the Outside In
Book
 

Dave Ulrich et al.

McGraw-Hill, 2012

(8)

The High-Impact HR Organization
Book

Stacey Harris

Bersin & Associates, 2011

(8)

Enterprise 2.0
Book
 

Andrew McAfee

Harvard Business Review Press, 2009

(8)

How to Learn? From Mistakes
Video

Diana Laufenberg

TED Conferences LLC, 2010

(8)

Conquering Innovation Fatigue
Book
 

Jeff Lindsay et al.

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2009

(8)

Making Innovation Work
Book
 

Tony Davila et al.

Wharton School Publishing, 2005

(9)

Effective Internal Communication
Book
 

Lyn Smith

Kogan Page, 2005

(5)

Immersive Learning
Book
 

Koreen Olbrish Pagano

ASTD Publications, 2013

(7)

The Power of the Tale
Book

Julie Allan et al.

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001

(6)

Mastering Organizational Knowledge Flow
Book

Frank Leistner

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2010

(7)

Intangible Capital
Book
 

Mary Adams and Michael Oleksak

Praeger, 2010

(7)

Leaders as Teachers
Book
 

Edward Betof

ASTD Publications, 2009

(8)

Knowledge Management Basics
Book
 

Christee Gabour Atwood

ASTD Publications, 2009

(8)

The New Edge in Knowledge
Book

Carla O'Dell and Cindy Hubert

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2011

(7)

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Knowledge Management

Data is available in such overwhelming quantities and from so many sources that it’s impossible to stay ahead. In fact, organizations that lack a formal mechanism for managing their knowledge typically suffer from chronic information overload. But there’s no need to panic. getAbstract’s summaries of the latest knowledge management books certainly can help your company structure its approach to information organization.

Knowledge management training also helps promote a proactive learning environment in which employees benefit from their colleagues’ wisdom and experience. You’ll read about companies that schedule regular meetings in which managers share their accomplishments, failures and strategies. These examples of positive and negative decision-making can guide others in making the right choices. Plus, sharing knowledge on a consistent basis makes learning on-going, improves operational functions and sends a positive message about your corporate culture.

Promote Innovation

Knowledge management training is advantageous on many levels, particularly in promoting innovation. Our summaries will demonstrate how the free exchange of ideas without fear of being reprimanded or ostracized allows for creative thinking. Employees trust that they can take chances and not be penalized if things don’t work out. Your workforce also learns that change is inevitable and doesn’t have to be unpleasant or unsettling. getAbstract proves that innovation and change are two of the most powerful engines that drive success.

Knowledge management doesn’t appear to be a casual option anymore as technological advancements will continue to accelerate the flow of information. If you need to make up ground, getAbstract can help. And if you’ve already embraced knowledge management, we’ll make you even better.