Investor Relations

Financial communications involves three groups of people: investors, analysts and the media. These summaries will help you learn how to best communicate with each group according to their varying expectations.

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Investment Banking
Get the hallway hints and backstage stories from Wall Street.

Summaries

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Dave Ulrich

Berrett-Koehler, 2015

(8)

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James F. Reda et al.

Wiley, 2007

(7)

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John C. Coffee

Oxford UP, 2006

(8)

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John A. Tracy

Wiley, 2004

(8)

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Jonathan A. Knee

Oxford UP, 2006

(10)

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John C. Bogle

Yale UP, 2005

(8)

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Alfred Rappaport

Free Press, 1997

(8)

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Thomas M. Ryan and Chad A. Jacobs

Wiley, 2004

(6)

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Mark C. Scott

Wiley, 2005

(5)

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Sally Stewart

Wiley, 2003

(9)

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Benjamin Mark Cole

Bloomberg Press, 2003

(8)

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Charles W. Mulford and Eugene E. Comiskey

Wiley, 2002

(8)

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Robert G. Eccles and Samuel A. DiPiazza

Wiley, 2002

(9)

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Benjamin Mark Cole

Bloomberg Press, 2001

(9)

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Robert G. Eccles et al.

Wiley, 2001

(9)

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John Rolfe and Peter Troob

Warner Books, 2000

(6)

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Investor Relations

Investor relations have evolved dramatically in the last decade since corporate scandals involving Enron, WorldCom and others spurred legislative reforms designed to promote accountability and transparency. Effective and forthright investor relations means a company candidly discloses its financial particulars with shareholders, the media, and government agencies. Many companies, in fact, now have public relations specialists who disseminate pertinent information to investors and the public. getAbstract’s investor relations summaries explain the fundamentals of establishing open channels of communication and methods for implementation. You can spend your valuable time searching the Internet and other sources for material that may be outdated or impractical, or join thousands of satisfied clients worldwide who rely on getAbstract to deliver no-nonsense advice. Our five-page summaries are loaded with quality information, yet written so clearly that you’ll understand the most complex concepts.

Big Changes

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 represented a significant change in the role of investor relations. The federal law required, among other things, that companies be more forthright in their financial disclosure and exhibit greater corporate accountability. Our summaries will help you understand the ramifications of legislation and how your organization can strengthen its credibility. You’ll learn how to build public trust and why there’s a direct correlation between your investor relations policy and the value of your company. You’ll also learn the most effective ways to communicate with the analysts on Wall Street. Establishing a partnership with getAbstract means you’ll never fall behind the learning curve. And staying current with the latest developments in investor relations represent merely a fraction of the business knowledge you’ll acquire with our service.