Summary of Please Don't Just Do What I Tell You, Do What Needs to Be Done

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Please Don't Just Do What I Tell You, Do What Needs to Be Done book summary
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Rating

6 Overall

7 Applicability

5 Innovation

6 Style

Recommendation

Corporate employees must contend with downsizing, scarce jobs and scarcer benefits. In today’s virtual corporations, a handful of employees do the work that many people used to do. To survive, make yourself an irreplaceable employee. That’s the short, sweet, familiar point (and the only message, given the book’s brevity) that Bob Nelson conveys in this simple but clear manual for long-term employment survival. Take the initiative, assume responsibility, know your job better than anybody else and fulfill your supervisor’s expectations – even the unspoken ones. Become indispensable: it’s here in a nutshell. getAbstract finds that Nelson provides valuable tips on being a proactive employee and, for fun, illustrates them with some bright little stories.

In this summary, you will learn

  • Why employees should always seize the initiative;
  • Why you should do more than your job requires;
  • How to become a hero by volunteering for the toughest assignments; and
  • How to plan, develop and implement good ideas.
 

About the Author

Bob Nelson writes books on management, including 1001 Ways to Reward Employees. He is an authority on employee recognition, rewards, motivation, morale, retention, productivity and management.

 

Summary

Don’t Just Get By
Does your boss have to tell you what to do? Or, do you figure out what needs to be done and do it? If you take the initiative, congratulations, you are more likely to keep your job. To survive in today’s competitive workplace, accept full accountability for your overall...

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