Summary of The Futurist

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The Futurist book summary
Predicting the future: It’s fun, it’s addictive, it’s necessary and it’s impossible (except in a novel).

Rating

6 Overall

5 Importance

7 Innovation

9 Style

Recommendation

This unusual novel is a lively, ironic, strange voyage through some of postmodern culture’s most brutal elements, evoked with exaggerated extremes. If that sounds contradictory, it is, and that’s the source of much of its power. Author James P. Othmer is both witty and gruesome as he moves from death on a South African soccer field to death in a space capsule, to relationships that appear and disappear. He critiques consumer culture and propaganda, continually nudging readers to notice their world’s ethical underpinnings. He surfs through mock-ups of the media events and cultural cross-pollinations that define modern times. The novel is set in the present, but it is laced with traces of William Gibson (Pattern Recognition) and the slightest hint of Philip K. Dick (Blade Runner). Beyond recommending this evocative story as a fun, if sometimes dismaying, read, getAbstract suggests it to futurists, promoters and anyone concerned about corporate ethics.

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About the Author

James P. Othmer “spent the last 20 years seeking the title ‘former adman’.” He was an executive creative director at Young & Rubicam and a finalist for the National Magazine Award.


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