Summary of Collectible Investments for the High Net Worth Investor

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Rating

8 Overall

8 Applicability

9 Innovation

7 Style


Recommendation

Financial advisers and money managers are comfortable with traditional investment vehicles, such as stocks and bonds and, perhaps, real estate. However, an increasing number of wealthy individuals are exploring alternative avenues for profitable investing, including collectibles. Consequently, investment houses and wealth managers need to familiarize themselves with art, stamps, wine, books, classic cars, and the like, to be qualified to advise clients who want to know if their acquisitions will bring in a pretty penny or not. Editor Stephen Satchell’s compilation of scholarly essays from a variety of experts on different collectibles – and on the psychology that motivates purchasers – is not a casual read, but it sure is a useful one for money managers whose clients want to cash in Grandma’s stamp collection. Much of the material deals with sophisticated economic and business theory, including mathematical formulas and detailed charts and graphs. Still, getAbstract believes that most financial advisers (and collectors) will emerge with a greater understanding of collectible investments – and maybe a hankering for a cherry red and white 1957 Chevrolet.

In this summary, you will learn

  • How to determine whether collectibles are a sensible, profitable investment option;
  • How psychological traits influence collectors, and
  • How to evaluate the viability of collectibles markets.
 

About the Author

Stephen Satchell is a Fellow of Trinity College, the Reader in Financial Econometrics at the University of Cambridge, and visiting professor at Birbeck College, City University Business School and University of Technology, Sydney.

 

Summary

Collecting Knowledge
Wealthy investors who are interested in collectibles pose a challenge for investment firms and wealth managers. Individuals who want to allocate money for potentially valuable collectibles expect their investment managers to be able to offer educated, sensible advice...

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