Summary of Global Risks 2035 Update: Decline or New Renaissance?

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Global Risks 2035 Update: Decline or New Renaissance? summary
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8

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  • Analytical
  • Well Structured

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In this update to its 2016 Global Risks 2035 report, the Atlantic Council reaffirms that the world is moving past globalization. Major changes since 2016, especially in the United States, reinforce the idea that nationalism and the growing rivalry between the United States and China will define the next decades. The detailed report examines key risks such as the disruption of labor by technology and climate change, and the potential economic and political ramifications of these developments. The Council’s projections will prove valuable to both public and private sector strategists.

About the Author

Mathew J. Burrows serves as the director of the Atlantic Council’s Foresight, Strategy, and Risks Initiative in the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security.

 

Summary

Climate Change is one of the largest risk the world faces.

In the years since 2016, when the Atlantic Council published Global Risks 2035, much has changed in global affairs. The election of Donald Trump as president of the United States has shifted that nation’s domestic politics and its relations with the rest of the world in fundamental ways. The populist leader has taken the United States on a far more confrontational path with other major world powers, especially in its relations with China.  

The rise of nationalism and populism in many countries around the world has resulted in a decline in cooperation and a growing hostility toward global trade and immigration. Meanwhile, little progress is evident on one of the largest risks the world faces: climate change.

The impacts of climate change will be asymmetrical, affecting poor nations most, and likely accelerate migration. Global migration is already at an all-time high, prompting a backlash from many developed countries. Technology will also have an impact on global labor markets, potentially rendering hundreds of millions...


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