Summary of Lead Right for Your Company’s Type

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Rating

8 Overall

8 Applicability

7 Innovation

8 Style


Recommendation

An oil-drilling field boss hired a sensitivity consultant to work with his crew. The consultant asked the crew members to describe their feelings for each other. They were uncomfortable and silent. This was a misapplication of sensitivity training. How oil rig workers feel about each other isn’t as relevant as how they handle the drill. Many leaders mistakenly assume that the management techniques that are good for one business are beneficial to all businesses. Implementing the wrong approaches and policies can damage your firm. Consulting psychologist and scholar William E. Schneider provides valuable information on tailoring your policy and management approach to four different types of enterprises – “customized, best-in-class, enrichment,” and “predictable and dependable.” Knowing what will work requires an astute understanding of your business. Organizational leaders can make good use of Schneider’s insights, charts, diagrams and assessment resources.  

In this summary, you will learn

  • How to define the four types of enterprises and the management system they need,
  • How to avoid “system disconnections” and
  • Why most mergers fail.
 

About the Author

Consulting psychologist William E. Schneider, PhD, co-owns Corporate Development Group, a Colorado leadership and organizational development firm.

 

Summary

Four Types of Enterprises

Organizations can take four general forms, but each company has its own distinctive culture, leadership style and promise to customers. Of these interdependent components, customer promise matters most. A firm’s culture and leadership depend on it. The four types of companies are:


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    Ashish Agarwal 2 months ago
    Makes one wonder who this writer is dreaming/ writing about because 99.9% companies do not fall in any of the four categories.