Summary of Building Strong Brands

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Building Strong Brands book summary
Your brand has four assets — awareness, perceived quality, loyalty, and association — and four perspectives — as a product, an organization, a personality, and a symbol. Here’s how to add them up for fun and profit.


7 Overall

9 Applicability

6 Innovation

7 Style


In this book, David A. Aaker discusses how a brand can be managed as a strategic asset and a source of competitive advantage. The companies whose work is described at length include Saturn, General Electric, Kodak, Healthy Choice, McDonald’s, and many others. Aaker shows how a brand should be considered as a product, a person, an organization, and a symbol. The book is an excellent in-depth approach to the many facets of brand development. However, it sometimes tends to go into extensive detail about slight differences in concepts and definitions, and it is written in a generally dry, academic style. But, the book offers excellent basic principles you can apply to improve your brand. getAbstract recommends this book to everyone involved in marketing.

In this summary, you will learn

  • Why consumers associate strong brands with quality products
  • Why you must define your brand’s core identity
  • How to get consumers to connect with your brand on an emotional level


The Elements of a Strong Brand
To build a strong brand, build on the concept of brand equity. View your brand as having a series of assets or liabilities linked to its name or symbol. These qualities add to the value of your product or service. Managed effectively, the brand makes your...
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About the Author

David A. Aaker is a professor of marketing strategy at the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. He has written ten books and more than eighty articles on branding, advertising, and business strategy. He lectures widely and consults for companies in the United States, Europe, and Japan.

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