Review of Scrum

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Rating

9

Qualities

  • For Experts
  • Applicable
  • Well Structured

Review

Jeff Sutherland, an accomplished ex-fighter pilot, and his co-author and son, war correspondent J.J. Sutherland, draw heavily on military analogies and metaphors throughout this engaging, entertaining manual on the agile project management method Scrum. They use vibrant examples, eye-popping statistics and simply worded instruction to provide compelling reasons and methods for adopting Scrum across industries, professions and geographies. This overview is not just for those who need hands-on teaching; if you’re familiar with the Scrum process and seek more evidence of its effectiveness, you will value this applicable manual. If you gain just 10% of what companies like SpaceX, Zappos and others achieved, you’ll be glad you read the Sutherlands’ overview – and implemented Scrum techniques in your life and work.

About the Authors

Jeff Sutherland started thinking systematically as a Vietnam fighter pilot. Ever since, he has looked for ways to do things better – first in software development, and today, across all fields. His co-author and son, J.J. Sutherland, is a war correspondent and writer.

 

Scrum is transformational.

Scrum involves quick “Sprints” of project development, followed by customer reviews and subsequent revisions. The Sutherlands explains that it avoids extensive up-front planning that can lead either to cost and time overruns or to complete failure. Scrum aligns how people and teams work. It assumes that things seldom go according to plan. By avoiding start-to-finish plans, Scrum allows for inspiration and creativity.

Scrum is rooted in a shared narrative.

Scrum asks you to frame projects as stories because people think and gain inspiration through narratives. The Sutherlands advise making the protagonist of your story the person the project will help. Explain why the protagonist wants the product and how it will help its users. Build as many sub-stories as you have Sprints.


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    K. S. 3 weeks ago
    if somebody talking about scrum - ask if he read this book, already. if not, stop listening to this guy.