Summary of Why We Shouldn’t Trust Markets with Our Civic Life

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Why We Shouldn’t Trust Markets with Our Civic Life summary
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Why should individuals worry about living in a “market society,” where everything is for sale? Harvard professor Michael Sandel explains that introducing marketing values and strategies into areas such as education and civic life changes their character and meaning. Moreover, market influences are intensifying income inequality and undermining democracy. If you’re interested in the hot-button topic of income inequality, getAbstract believes this popular TED Talk is a must-see.

In this summary, you will learn

  • How America has become a “market society,”
  • What moral implications this has for the nation, and
  • Why market values and practices are not always a beneficial influence.
 

About the Speaker

Michael Sandel is a political philosophy professor at Harvard University. He teaches a popular course on justice, which is viewable on YouTube.

 

Summary

“Market thinking” and “market values” are permeating society. Inmates can pay to upgrade their jail cells. Lobbyists can hire someone to stand in line for them prior to Congressional...

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