Summary of Innovation Training

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Innovation Training book summary
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Recommendation

If you think innovation is a terrific idea, but have no clue how to inculcate it into your organization, you’ve come to the right place. Ruth Ann Hattori and Joyce Wycoff, innovation consultants, speakers, and corporate veterans, have written an instructive guide that is short on theory and long on practical application. To their credit, the authors spend little time discussing innovation psychology and principles. They are more concerned with outlining model training sessions and workshops where participants can acquire the skills they need in the real world. The book includes a CD with PowerPoint presentations and training materials that you can print and distribute. Imbedding innovation is not a rapid process, particularly within companies that have never embraced it. However, getAbstract believes these two authors make a compelling case for innovation and provide the material you need to launch a successful initiative.

About the Authors

Ruth Ann Hattori and Joyce Wycoff co-founded an innovation consultancy and training company. Hattori designs programs to teach organizations how to improve their collaborative and innovative practices. Wycoff is a speaker, trainer and facilitator, and the author of four books, including Mindmapping and To Do, Doing, Done.

 

Summary

Innovation is Not Optional

Innovation is no longer an option for companies that must remain competitive. In fact, innovation plays an increasingly larger role as technology continues to extend the reach of the global marketplace. Organizational leaders understand the importance of developing creative ideas that boost profits and add value for customers, stakeholders and the company itself. Alas, the daily pressures of managing a business and focusing on bottom-line results may preclude many corporate leaders from guiding their companies to develop infrastructures that deliver innovation. However, failing to teach and foster innovation may be a luxury you can no longer afford.

One 1996 study showed that innovative companies have four times the profit growth of non-innovative companies. In a 1998 survey of 400 companies, 70% mentioned innovation as a priority. However, a survey of 350 organizations in 2000 indicated that fewer than 15% had acquired the technology to handle innovation.

Although business owners and managers clearly recognize the benefits of innovation, they just don’t seem to know how to embrace it. Many top executives merely shrug, believing that...


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