Summary of The Five Thieves of Happiness

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Rating

8 Overall

9 Applicability

7 Innovation

8 Style


Recommendation

Leadership trainer John Izzo explains that joy and happiness are natural aspects of every human being. During an eight-month sabbatical spent walking the Camino de Santiago in Spain and living in the Andes of Peru, he identified the five elements – which he calls the “five thieves” – that prevent people from being happy. The challenge, he says, is to remove the mental barriers that prevent you from accessing your happiness and living a fulfilling life. In this gem of a self-help book, Izzo skillfully constructs a watertight case that happiness exists inside each person: You don’t have to acquire it – just dust it off and put into effect. getAbstract believes his optimistic, accessible outlook may challenge your thinking and lift up your attitude.

In this summary, you will learn

  • How to handle the “five thieves of happiness” – “control, conceit, coveting, consumption” and “comfort”;
  • Why happiness is a natural state; and
  • How to live a life of “contentment.”               
 

About the Author

Author of The Five Secrets You Must Discover Before You Die and five other books, John Izzo, PhD, has spoken to more than one million people worldwide at conferences and corporate events.

 

Summary

Happiness Is at Hand 

Modern culture seems obsessed with finding the keys to attaining and maintaining happiness. The belief that people must work to acquire happiness makes the problem worse. Most people assume that events in their lives determine their happiness – even though many individuals seem happy despite their hardships while others remain unhappy despite numerous blessings. To achieve true happiness and long-term “contentment,” disconnect your sense of “happiness from happenings.” Happiness can endure regardless of life’s ups and downs. Society conditions people to believe that being happy is hard. But happiness is readily accessible. Being out in nature calms and soothes you because you don’t need to take any particular action to connect with its serenity. Tranquility is available to every person. Eastern practices such as meditation and yoga help you unite with the stillness and spiritual calm that is already within you.


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Comment on this summary

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    Anonymous 8 months ago
    Definitely worth the read!
  • Avatar
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    great
  • Avatar
    Salend Kumar 9 months ago
    'Happy' reading!
  • Avatar
    Anonymous 9 months ago
    very interesting theory one might have been practicing parts of it without consciousness. very interesting read and good summary, wish one of the facebook short videos makes it into one short video to share it to the world. the new world of social networking even for knowledge.
  • Avatar
    Gerald Peter Müller 9 months ago
    Good work
  • Avatar
    Andre Siegert 9 months ago
    It is all about awareness. Being aware is the first and foremost necessity to embark on a journey into a more fulfilling and happier life indeed. Whether you call them thiefs or limiting belief or wrong focus, in the end, the important thing is to know your current wrong doing or challenge in order to be able to tackle and correct it. And I can agree with the author, that true happiness can only start from within (the mind) and by recognizing your current state.
  • Avatar
    Bertus Mouton 9 months ago
    Wow. So insightful and so true. Love the bland the thought to challenge everything people and social media want us to believe with regard to happiness . Thanks for this review!
  • Avatar
    Chong Park 9 months ago
    Ashish, I really like your argument, but still feel that the author has given us a good first direction to a better society although I somehow agree that we as human beings find also happiness in having friends and family so being too egocentric is not the way.

    Saying so, I also believe that you as individual need to have a certain degree of “self happiness” to share it with your environment.
  • Avatar
    Ashish Agarwal 9 months ago
    "True happiness doesn’t hinge on events or life circumstances. It lies within", I disagree with the author's basic premise of the book. If everyone was to become content with whatever life is dishing at you and/ or become oblivious to our fellow beings' plight, then what kind of society would that be?

    One could argue that the 'thieves of happiness' are not essentially thieves, but your conscience asking you to recognize the problem at hand and do something to make things better, and by showing them the door, one is becoming increasingly inhumane; and that is not the kind of happiness anyone should be striving for/ arrive at.
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    Chong Park 9 months ago
    This summary reminded me once again that the Asian society I am currently living in pushes us towards control and coveting in order to improve oneself within a highly competitive environment. I got jealous ^^ about spending 8 months walking the Camino de Santiago and the Andes like the author. Thank you for reminding me about accepting the happenings.
  • Avatar
    Karel De Troch 9 months ago
    New interesting point of views.
  • Avatar
    Sahaya Raj Raphael 9 months ago
    Sahay Provides new insights and steers to acceptance and acknowledgement of the situations that we encounter.
  • Avatar
    Haruna Vongjen Yaknan 10 months ago
    Its clears a lots of glaring thoughts in me
  • Avatar
    Amanda Hall 1 year ago
    I found this Abstract to be very enlightening and interesting. I liked it so much I shared it during my weekly team meeting. Lots of good stuff in here!
  • Avatar
    Valeriy Mitrokhin 1 year ago
    Pretty interesting though I expected less but very satisfied that the material exceeded all my expectations thanks for the cognitive life lesson
  • Avatar
    Valeriy Mitrokhin 1 year ago
    Take responsibility and become a leader
  • Avatar
    Oren Halperin 1 year ago
    Fantastic !
  • Avatar
    Jack Jormanonson 1 year ago
    cool!
  • Avatar
    Jenmel Askie 1 year ago
    Truly inspiring
  • Avatar
    Matthew Davidson 1 year ago
    Excellent read
  • Avatar
    Adetokunbo Oni 1 year ago
    Great talk.
  • Avatar
    Adriana Ramirez 1 year ago
    reminds you of how important happiness is and that in the end, we are in control of it
  • Avatar
    Anonymous 1 year ago
    aweson
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    PATRICIA GARNER 1 year ago
    Good self awareness
  • Avatar
    Mahesh Dighe 1 year ago
    nice
  • Avatar
    Andreas Loof 1 year ago
    From time to time it is needed to remind yourself to be more happy! Smart abstract to get a first idea ...
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    Fernando Perez 1 year ago
    Love this. I'd say is not necessary do two out of the three steps described to banish the thieves. If you do #1 - Notice, the system takes care of the rest. Simply noticing makes an unhappy thought disappear or change.
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    Albert Keenan 1 year ago
    I enjoyed this.
  • Avatar
    Taylor Nicole Victoria 1 year ago
    A short, digestible and easy-to-remember snippet about happiness. Some tangible and actionable take-sways too.
  • Avatar
    Natasia Mc Mahon 1 year ago
    Enlightening. Opens the mind and makes one more aware of destructive thoughts and feelings.
  • Avatar
    Thabo Mosala 1 year ago
    Interesting
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    Qin Xu 1 year ago
    Coveting there is not the word
  • Avatar
    Qin Xu 1 year ago
    good
  • Avatar
    Iman Slaoui 1 year ago
    Trueee
  • Avatar
    Maja Schumann 1 year ago
    Interesting
  • Avatar
    VeerendraKumar Biradar 1 year ago
    Nice