Summary of eGov

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eGov book summary

Editorial Rating

8

Qualities

  • Innovative

Recommendation

This informative, well-researched and brightly written overview of government e-business will fill you in on how far governments worldwide have come in offering services via the Internet, and what more they have to do to make the most of what the technology has to offer. It’s a fascinating read that highlights the Internet’s incredible power in bringing people, causes and issues together in the name of social activism, politics and democracy. getAbstract.com recommends this book to all readers with an interest in better - or at least more efficient - government.

About the Author

Douglas Holmes  has been covering information technology issues within the public sector since 1992. He is now editor of E-Government News, Microsoft’s global newsletter for the public sector. He was previously editorial director of London based Government Group Publications, which published Government Computing and Government Purchasing magazines.

Summary

E-Government

E-business has the potential to have a greater effect on the public sector than it has on the private sector. People want instant access to government and public services online, including transactions, support and personalized services tailored to their individual needs. The Internet provides governments worldwide the opportunity to deliver services that are cost effective, customer-oriented and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. E-government already is underway:

  • Every week, Minnesotans send 13,000 e-mails to their governor.
  • 75% of Australians file their income tax over the Internet.
  • A billion health insurance claims in France are submitted electronically each year.
  • Brazilians vote electronically in all national and local elections.
  • Administrative costs in the U.S. Department of Agriculture dropped from $77 per transaction to $17 after the introduction of an e-procurement system.
  • It only takes 25 seconds for police in Scandinavia to transmit a fingerprint image.
  • A traffic Web site for commuters in Minneapolis is viewed 3000,000 times a day.
  • University students in Germany register for exams...

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