Review of Under the Hood

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Rating

9 Overall

9 Applicability

8 Innovation

9 Style


Review

 

Executives love to plan and introduce new business strategies. They begin with fanfare and celebratory kickoffs. Then come territorial road shows, intranet sites touting the strategies and the “strategy T-shirts, the strategy posters, the strategy mouse pads, the strategy screen savers and the strategy wallet cards.” Each new tactical initiative means new “rules of survival” for employees, who find such cultural upheavals unnerving. Employee cultures are “initiative-weary and -wary.” The solution to this dilemma can be easy to understand but difficult to accomplish: Leaders must get their employee cultures to commit – emotionally and practically – to their organizations’ interests, plans and activities. Employee-commitment expert and best-selling author Stan Slap explains how to reach this critical goal in witty and engaging detail.

About the Author

Stan Slap is founder and CEO of SLAP Company, an international consulting and management development firm. He also wrote Bury My Heart at Conference Room B: The Unbeatable Impact of Truly Committed Managers.

 

Employee Culture, Not Executives

Employee-commitment expert and best-selling author Stan Slap asserts that employee culture is all-powerful in any organization. You may think your company’s goals matter most, but Slap says your employee culture can subvert your goals and the managers who support them. Top executives mistakenly believe they run their firms and are responsible for the organizations’ success. But, ultimately, Slap says, employee culture determines success. What employee culture wants, employee culture gets. Executives and managers can’t do everything – or much of anything – by themselves. They need their employees – or, to be exact, their employee culture – to support them and make their initiatives real.

GoDaddy 

In business since the late 1990s, GoDaddy is a superstar website-hosting firm with more than 12 million clients. Slap attributes its success to its employee culture. Hosting websites means GoDaddy needs staffers working around the clock. In its early years, it relied on volunteers from the staff to cover Christmas and other holidays, and plenty of people would volunteer.  In June 2012,  GoDaddy suffered a precipitous revenue decline. To meet its projections, it had to achieve “280% of quota in three days” over the long Fourth of July weekend. Vice president Bob Olson was in charge of making sure the company hit its quota. Responding to his request, employees volunteered to work for the crucial three-day period. The company made the three days a continuous party, with free food and fun gifts. GoDaddy achieved its 280% target. With the extra perks and festive atmosphere, Slap say the company took “care of business by taking care of our own.”  


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