Summary of We Should Aim for Perfection – and Stop Fearing Failure

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We Should Aim for Perfection – and Stop Fearing Failure summary
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Rating

8

Qualities

  • Analytical
  • Concrete Examples
  • Inspiring

Recommendation

UPS driver trainer Jon Bowers doesn’t tolerate anything short of perfection. He’s a stickler for details and demands seamless execution of the rules. Why? Because the consequences of imperfection could be deadly. In this presentation, Bowers makes an impassioned plea to reject the prevailing “do-your-best attitude” in favor of striving for perfection. His energetic, pithy talk will inspire managers, leaders and employees to set their sights higher.

About the Speaker

Jon Bowers oversees driver training at a UPS instructional facility.

 

Summary

Google makes millions of dollars by “typosquatting” – that is, advertising on websites that users frequently misspell. The company profits from user error. But mistakes are rarely so lucrative. When a coder at Amazon accidentally entered a typo in the company’s “supercode,” the mistake slowed the entire Internet and lost the company more than $160 million in just four hours. When an employee at New England Compound didn’t clean a pharmaceutical lab thoroughly, more than 700 people contracted meningitis, 76 of whom died. It’s time to start valuing perfection.


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    C. H. 5 months ago
    Oh well, he lost me at the wrinkle shirt and how his staff have to have wrinkled free shirts and brown shoes. Umm, wonder what part of perfection in his delivery on stage with a clearly wrinkled shirt will drive his key points. Why not replace "Perfection" with "Succeed". Raised good points, but I'm not sure being a perfectionist somehow will deliver flawless outcome. Point in case: "Himself and the wrinkled shirt".