Summary of Power Questions

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Rating

7 Overall

8 Applicability

7 Innovation

6 Style

Recommendation

Client relationship expert Andrew Sobel and consultant Jerold Panas show how asking the right kind of questions and listening to the responses can strengthen your professional and personal relationships. They explain that asking the right questions matters more than being able to spout easy answers. Asking good questions demonstrates your ability to listen and shows your commitment to your clients. In each of the 35 chapters, the authors tell an anecdote about a “power question,” explain when to use it, and offer alternative questions and potential follow-up queries. Some questions cut to the chase, while others build strong bonds. Some are blue-sky queries, while others are direct. Most of these short chapters aren’t always compelling reading – but they’re useful. The authors provide 293 additional power questions in the index covering winning new business, building relationships, resolving crises, and so forth. getAbstract recommends this hands-on manual to executives, managers and anyone who works with clients.

In this summary, you will learn

  • What “power questions” are and how to ask them,
  • How power questions provide insight and help you solve problems, and
  • What power questions you should ask – and when.
 

About the Authors

Client relationship expert Andrew Sobel wrote All for One and Clients for Life. Jerold Panas is CEO of Jerold Panas, Linzy & Partners, a consulting firm advising nonprofits on fundraising.

 

Summary

Questions that Work and Don’t Work
The CEO of a $12-billion company offered a simple explanation about how he forms an opinion of other people in the early stages of a business relationship. He gauges “the quality of their questions and how intently they listen.” This CEO confirmed that...

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    Michelle Donati-Grayman 11 months ago
    I've always liked to ask questions, but this summary made me realize I might not be asking the right ones. By stepping back, asking "power questions" and soaking up responses, I know I can be more effective as an employee and manager.

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